Previously unreleased Drive Like Jehu song released!!! Not on any album/7″/official release!!!

Wow, check it out, in this Drive Like Jehu show from 1992 at the X-Ray Cafe in Portland, Oregon, starting at 30:00, there’s a TOTALLY UNRELEASED DRIVE LIKE JEHU SONG that I had never heard before and is not on any album, 7″, compilation, or any other live video I’ve ever seen.

Does anyone know the guys in this band, are there any other rare gems out there?     Totally awesome.  The only other unreleased piece of Jehu I’ve ever heard is the original? or an alternate intro for New Math–you know how it’s called “New Intro” on Yank Crime?  If you listen to the recording of the live Drive Like Jehu KXLU radio set, the intro to New Math is totally different than on Yank Crime and is totally awesome too…

 

Six Finger Satellite’s Influence on Daft Punk’s Homework?

Six Finger Satellite–Rabies (Baby’s Got the)

Six Finger Satellite’s 1995 album “Severe Exposure,” specifically the song “Rabies (Baby’s Got the)” may have influenced Daft Punk’s 1996 single Da Funk, which is also featured on their  Homework album from 1997.  How you may ask?  Check out the keyboard stabs in Da Funk–conceptually similar to this arpeggiated keyboard part/stab in Rabies–then especially, check out that high pitched keyboard sound in Rabies–the notes played are similar to that main winding keyboard riff in Da Funk, it’s just that the riff in Da Funk has a little more frills.  And notice how the keyboard sound in the first few seconds of Rabies (also used to echo the main bassline periodically after :50 seconds in the song) sounds alot like the keyboard sound used for the main melody/winding keyboard part of Da Funk and a sound used alot on Daft Punk’s Human After All album.  I’m not saying these parts sound exactly the same, but that both feature conceptually similar keyboard stabs and winding synth parts with very similar notes.  They also both feature steady beats–a little more rock in Rabies,  still dancey/disco-ish,  and a little bit more straightforward dance/funk in Da Funk.

Daft Punk obviously listened to lots of weird 70s music, disco, electronic, experimental music (see all the music they sampled for Discovery and Human After All and the songs they picked for their Electroma movie), and I would not be surprised if they may have heard about this weird American band Six Finger Satellite that was making weird 70s-ish punk-electronic hybrid punk dance music in 1995 through friends, the press, or college radio, and having eclectic experimental tastes, may have picked up the album and been impressed with Rabies, which may have consciously or subconsciously influenced Da Funk.  What do you think?  On first listen, you may think, “These sound nothing alike.”  But keep your ear open for the conceptual similarities of the keyboard stabs, and the conceptual similarity of the notes of the main winding keyboard parts/main melody and the steady drum beats–conceptually they’re pretty similar in structure and intent.  Interestingly, the soundman for Six Finger Satellite, James Murphy, would go on to start LCD Soundsystem, and would end up making a song “Daft Punk is Playing at My House,” so you can see that there are definitely some conceptual and music shared roots there.

Daft Punk–Da Funk

Shiny Beast CD–Stop Looking at Us…We’re Waving Goodbye–best unreleased music/reissue from the 90s!

Shiny Beast…imagine a mix between Killing Technology-era Voivod and the Jesus Lizard with Germbox and Drive Like Jehu and mathier-Black Flag/Greg Ginn, you get the idea!  FINALLY they have a reissue compilation filled with unreleased tracks etc–37 tracks long!  The first 11 are from the Boner Records session and adds like 7 new, fantastic tracks from that era.  Also includes the Regraped split material–sounds like the remastered this or something, sounds way better than I remember the 12″ sounding–and a live show!  The guitarist David Sullivan is in the awesome band Red Fang (which is opening for Mastodon on their latest tour) and drummer Brian Walsby does comics etc)…

Buy it at Interpunk.com: Shiny Beast

Shiny Beast–Lodestar (not even one of their best, I’ll try to upload something better to youtube later!)

Sonic Youth and Pink Floyd

Pink Floyd: Interstellar Overdrive

Kurt: “Exactly which parts of daydream nation sound like pink floyd? Minutemen are prog rock? I think you are stretching your “everything is prog rock” thesis a bit too far. If you said that husker du sounded like king crimson on zen arcade then yes, but really, come on. Exactly which parts of daydream nation sound like pink floyd? Minutemen are prog rock? I think you are stretching your “everything is prog rock” thesis a bit too far. If you said that husker du sounded like king crimson on zen arcade then yes, but really, come on.”

Trickledown:
Basically, the first two Minutemen albums as prog rock: the complicated bass and the tricky timing that’s way different from punk rock, the bass is like in Yes or Gentle Giant, the guitar is complicated and tricky, so is the drumming, it’s way different from punk or hardcore, and the Minutemen were big fans of Captain Beefheart which falls under the prog rock umbrella in terms of experimentation.

I would say the first two Minutemen albums are as much prog rock as they are punk, not necessarily like keyboard laden prog but tricky time change prog (Yes and Gentle Giant happen to have bits of both). Daydream Nation, the echo and noise breakdowns like in Silver Rocket and Total Trash, are very similar in parts and vibe to a lot of Pink Floyd’s Piper at the Gates of Dawn, it’s their most indie album, with Syd Barret, I’m not talking about Dark Side of the Moon or anything.

Check out songs like Interstellar Overdrive (the beginning few seconds sounds exactly like a song on Daydream Nation or Goo even!) or Astronomy Domine, they’re quite different from more mainstream Pink Floyd (which I happen to like too). They’re very experimental noise rock, art rock, postpunk even at times, much different from what people consider more “bloated” PInk Floyd (but which has become much more influential on bands like Godspeed You Black Emperor etc in recent years).

Pink Floyd: Astronomy Domine

Here’s another person in a book on rock calling Minutemen prog rock, saying they fused hardcore and prog… Also here: “Borrowing the pagan impetus from hardcore, the harsh quirkiness from the new wave and the cerebral, and the convoluted indulgence from progressive-rock, the Minutemen concocted the miniature hardcore shrapnels of Punch Line (feb 1981 – nov 1981) and What Makes A Man Start Fires (jul/aug 1982 – jan 1983).

The acrobatic primitivism of these albums became even more neurotic and atonal on Double Nickels On The Dime (nov 1983/apr 1984 – jul 1984), one of the most ambitious recordings of the decade, a veritable encyclopedia of musical styles revisited from the point of view of a spastic genius reminiscent of Captain Beefheart and the Pop Group. After Boon’s untimely death in 1985, the survivors hired a new vocalist, renamed themselves fIREHOSE (1), released Ragin’ Full On (oct 1986 – nov 1986) and pursued a more conscious program to refound the song format, except that R.E.M.-like folk-rock took over Minutemen’s unpredictable structures.” http://www.scaruffi.com/history/cpt49.html

Pink Floyd and Sonic Youth:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2009/jun/05/sonic-youth-rock-music
“Gary Gersh, who signed us, had some sort of idea that ‘You guys could be the next Pink Floyd,'” Gordon remembers with a smile.”

Here’s a comment on Youtube
“Anybody else think that Sonic Youth ripped early floyd off alot….?” rassault 1 month ago

A whole thread on Piper at the Gates of Dawn on a Sonic Youth fan site http://www.sonicyouth.com/gossip/showthread.php?t=16479

Also,
“As D. Boon of the Minutemen famously said, “Punk is whatever we made it to be.” This seemed especially true of the generation of American iconoclasts associated with independent labels such as SST and Discord in the 1980s. Not unlike prog-rock or fusion of the time, these bands experimented with song structure, lyrical content, improvisation, and even crowd control. But unlike their more “respectable” counterparts, the punks sought to disrupt the complacent social order they inherited.”
http://www.bassplayer.com/article/21st-century-upright/April-2010/110637

Joe Strummer & the Mescaleros: All In A Day


Joe Strummer & the Mescaleros: All In A Day

Wow, how did I miss this one? From their album Streetcore released in 2003, Joe Strummer & the Mescaleros: All In A Day. This is like the most Manchester feel-good rock/funk/dance song since the 1990s, like Beatles meets Stone Roses and of course Big Audio Dynamite. RIP Joe Strummer!

Drive Like Jehu covered by…The Deftones????

I am a huge Drive Like Jehu fan…surprisingly, the Deftones (I always think of them as some nu-metal band I wouldn’t like) have come out with what I think is a pretty good cover of the Drive Like Jehu song Caress!!! I mean, I wish Rick Froberg and John Reis would rock out like this still! Part of the key is, they never, ever had another band with a drummer as colossally good as Mark Trombino…

The Art of Rick Fork–Headhunter Records ads, Drive Like Jehu, Rocket From the Crypt, etc

In the 1990s San Diego was a happening place for a few indie, punk, and postpunk bands, some of the most notable were Drive Like Jehu, Rocket From the Crypt, and Pitchfork.  Many were on a label Headhunter Records. Singer/guitarist/artist Rick Fork/Rick Froberg/Rick Farr did the art for a lot of these bands and Headhunter Records ads.  Here are some scans of some of the art he did for Headhunter Records including ads for Drive Like Jehu and Rocket from the Crypt. Some of the scans were contributed by Paul Stanley and Jeffrey from the Swami Records forum. ..

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